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Love Both Keep Both

Passport to Peace, Prosperity and Strengthened Diplomacy

A diplomat with dual nationality tells the story of his heritage from a Japanese mother and American father, and his lifelong desire to serve the United States as a member of the U.S. Foreign Service in Japan.

In a memoir both personal and public, Ken Reiman, a diplomat with dual nationality, tells the story of his heritage from a Japanese mother and American father, and his lifelong desire to serve the United States as a member of the U.S. Foreign Service in Japan. Reiman traces his education in Arizona, childhood summers in Japan, and his grandmothers' love as driving forces behind his unwavering commitment to be a bridge between the U.S. and Japan. At 24, Reiman entered the world of diplomacy serving the U.S. with distinction in Asia, Africa, and South America. He takes us on many journeys describing good times as well as high stress and bureaucratic obstacles while always seeking an appointment in Japan. Throughout heartbreak and struggles to prove his loyalty, his story argues for advantages for both countries to utilize dual nationals instead of shunning them. He calls for beneficial new considerations governments should undertake to promote diversity, diplomacy, and peace.Love Both, Keep Both is informative as well as heartfelt, especially for Americans who understand the inherent value of diversity and Japanese who view the U.S. as their greatest ally. The message is simple: embrace dual nationality as a gift, and never apologize for loving all of who you are to become the positive force for change God intended you to be.

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Ken Reiman is a current United States Foreign Service Officer for the United States Department of State. Ken has served for over 16 years in the diplomatic corps as a U.S. diplomat faithfully serving the United States in every cone of expertise: political, economic, consular, public affairs, and management. From his entry into the Foreign Service in 2002, and subsequent first diplomatic assignment in Taiwan, Ken's career of service has spanned four geographic regions from Asia to Africa to South America and the Caribbean. Eager to contribute to the success of U.S. diplomacy, Ken has coached U.S. ambassadors and senior State Department officials, selected the future of the Foreign Service, advised Members of Congress, liaised with foreign ministers and heads of state, mentored diplomats, and trained foreign affairs professionals for overseas assignments in Asia and Africa. He speaks Mandarin, Japanese, and French. Ken is the recipient of numerous Department of State Medals of Honor and Letters of Commendation for his diplomatic service in advancing United States political, economic and commercial interests, managing crises, and protecting United States citizens overseas. He is the proud parent of two Japanese American boys: John and Max to whom this book is dedicated.