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Blue Skies, No Fences

A Memoir of Childhood and Family

Read by Lynne Cheney

Revisit a time when Americans felt sure of themselves and the future.

Home to the Wonder Bar, the Rialto Theater, and Lloyd's Confectionary, Casper was like many small towns in the 1940s -- except it sat on mile-high Wyoming prairie stretching on as far as the eye could see. In this place so full of the sense of possibility, Lynne Cheney grew up listening to Queen for a Day on her family's Zenith radio, playing Wonder Woman with her friends, and dreaming at night that she could fly, soaring upward into the endless blue sky.

In this affectionate memoir, she describes a town where little girls wore dresses, but still played rough-and-tumble games and where insightful, caring teachers knew what the children in their classes were capable of and refused to let them fall short. She recalls the resolute women in her family -- in particular, her mother -- who was determined that there would be no limits on her daughter's aspirations. And she recounts her courtship with one of the local daredevils who grew up to be the man she would marry.

Drawing on a wealth of sources, Lynne interweaves in her memoir the stories of westward-moving men and women -- Puritans and Mormons, Germans and Scots Irish -- whose journeys brought her family and the vice president's to the high Wyoming plains. Evocative and enlightening, Blue Skies, No Fences recalls an era of immense appeal and sets it within the sweep of American history, reminding us that our lives are intertwined, not only with those who share our years, but with others who lived before us.

Photo Credit:

Lynne Cheney’s most recent book is the New York Times bestseller, We the People: The Story of Our Constitution, illustrated by Greg Harlin. She is also the author of the New York Times bestsellers America: A Patriotic Primer, A Is for Abigail: An Almanac of Amazing American Women, When Washington Crossed the Delaware: A Wintertime Story for Young Patriots, A Time for Freedom: What Happened When in America, and Our 50 States: A Family Adventure Across America, and has written a memoir, Blue Skies, No Fences. Mrs. Cheney is a senior fellow at the American Enterprise Institute and former chair of the National Endowment for the Humanities. She lives in Washington, DC, with her husband, Vice President Richard B. Cheney.

Photo Credit:

Lynne Cheney’s most recent book is the New York Times bestseller, We the People: The Story of Our Constitution, illustrated by Greg Harlin. She is also the author of the New York Times bestsellers America: A Patriotic Primer, A Is for Abigail: An Almanac of Amazing American Women, When Washington Crossed the Delaware: A Wintertime Story for Young Patriots, A Time for Freedom: What Happened When in America, and Our 50 States: A Family Adventure Across America, and has written a memoir, Blue Skies, No Fences. Mrs. Cheney is a senior fellow at the American Enterprise Institute and former chair of the National Endowment for the Humanities. She lives in Washington, DC, with her husband, Vice President Richard B. Cheney.

"Cheney's memoir of her childhood in Casper, Wyoming, is a captivating amalgam of genealogy and gems of 1950s memorabilia that will bring smiles of recognition to readers of her generation." - Deborah Donovan, Booklist

"A riveting book." - Mike Gallagher, The Mike Gallagher Show

"A delightful memoir of more innocent days" - Kathryn Jean Lopez, National Review Online

"Mrs. Cheney says she knows her grandchildren cannot live as she once did, but her touching memoir makes one wish that they and other young Americans might possess what she evokes so well as she tells her own and her family's story: the resiliency to deal with challenges, the determination to do one's best, and an optimism about their future and America's future" - Myrna Blyth, National Review

"Lynne Cheney's credentials are, as far as I can tell, unprecedented among vice-presidents' wives: a doctorate in English, author of numerous books, Lockheed Martin Corp. director, chair of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Now a senior fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, she is known for her combative conservatism, yet there is almost nothing about partisan politics in this nostalgic memoir. On the other hand, there is a good deal about achievement...In the '50s, girls were not typically encouraged to express aspirations beyond home, hearth, and helpmate. Young Lynne Vincent did. I am intrigued enough to hope for a sequel that reveals more about her blond ambition." - Grace Lichtenstein, Washington Post Book World

More books from this author: Lynne Cheney