Skip to Main Content

Wordsworth

Lakeland Poetry

Introduction by Sally Bushell

Vivid and personal, William Wordsworth’s lyrical works deal with such topics as morality, spirituality, grief, and appreciation of nature. Wordsworth was a central figure of English Romanticism and much of his poetry was inspired by the beautiful setting of the Lake District, where he lived most of his life. This collection gathers around fifty of his best-loved odes, ballads and sonnets, including ‘I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud’, ‘Ode: Intimations on Immortality’, ‘The World Is Too Much with Us’ and ‘My Heart Leaps up When I Behold’.

Author of the semi-autographical work The Prelude, the English poet William Wordsworth was born in the Lake District in 1770. His first collections of poems, An Evening Walk and Descriptive Sketches, were published in 1793, and he met Samuel Taylor Coleridge two years later. Their joint publication of Lyrical Ballads in 1798 effectively set the British Romantic Movement into motion, and together with Robert Southey they formed part of the group of ‘Lake Poets’.

More books in this series: Verse to Inspire