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The Iron Counter

Too much dietary iron may be second only to smoking among the risks for heart disease, according to a recent, revolutionary Finnish study. The results of the five-year research program, reported in The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal, further suggest that iron, a vital nutrient often added to foods and supplements, may be stored in our bodies and accumulate as we age—promoting cancer, arthritis, and other disorders. And a 1989 study showed that, while a country's average cholesterol reading may not correspond directly to its heart attack rate, its combined cholesterol-and-iron count usually does.

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Annette B. Natow, Ph.D., C.D.N., and Jo-Ann Heslin, M.A., R.D., C.D.N. are the authors of thirty books on nutrition, including two college textbooks. Both are former faculty members of Adelphi University and the State University of New York, Downstate Medical Center. They were the editors of the Journal of Nutrition for the Elderly for 23 years and serve as editorial board members for Environmental Nutrition Newsletter, Vitality, and American Baby Magazine.

For more information on Annette B. Natow and Jo-Ann Heslin, plus articles and advice, go to: TheNutritionExperts.com.

More books from this author: Annette B. Natow