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Tartabull's Throw

In the summer of 1967, Cyrus Nygerski, nineteen and "the best left-handed second baseman in Wisconsin," unsuspectingly meets his first werewolf.
Six hours later, she is sitting next to him in Comiskey Park, watching the Red Sox play the White Sox on August 27th, but by the time Boston outfielder José Tartabull fires his famous, game-winning throw to home, the mysterious beauty is suddenly disappearing into the crowd. Nygerski is frantic. The next morning he reads about her in a Chicago paper, though not by name: there's no mention of Cassandra Paine-only of a vicious murder back in Beloit of a man who, in another version of events, appears to be very much alive and out for Nygerski's blood.
Among Cassandra's abilities is time travel. Nygerski learns of this later (or is it earlier?) on the seacoast of Maine where she introduces him to her family and the tantalizing legend of Howley's Deep Hole, a portal into an alternate time line that sweeps him to the heights of rookie season stardom. It's then-and at a terrifying cost-that he earns the nickname "Moon-dog." Even Cassandra can't foresee the prophecy in that.
Henry Garfield interweaves a classic Red Sox pennant race, the supernatural, a love and coming-of-age story, and a memorable cast of earthly and unearthly characters into a treat for baseball fans, horror buffs, devotees of science fiction, and lovers of suspense.

Henry Garfield lives in Belfast, Maine, where he keeps a small sailboat for explorations of the coastal waters. He is the author of three mystery-
suspense novels: Moondog, Room 13, and Tartabull's Throw, and writes a regular column for villagesoup.com, an Internet newspaper in Maine. He is the great-great-grandson of President James A. Garfield, the last U.S. president born in a log cabin.

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