Skip to Main Content

Maestro

Greenspans Fed And The American Boom

Epilogue by Bob Woodward / Read by James Naughton

Perhaps the last Washington secret is how the Federal Reserve and its enigmatic chairman, Alan Greenspan, operate. What do they do? Why precisely do they do it? Who is Greenspan? How does he think? What is the basis for his decisions? Why is he so powerful? What kind of relationships has he had with Reagan, Bush, and Clinton -- presidents during the 13 years he has been Fed chairman?
The Greenspan years, 1987 to 2000, are presented here as a gripping, intimate narrative, a remarkable portrait of how one man has become the symbol of American economic preeminence.
Maestro reveals a fascinating intellectual journey. Greenspan, and old-school anti-inflation hawk of the traditional economy, was among the first to realize the potential in the modern, high-productivity new economy -- the foundation of the current American boom.
Reappointed by Clinton in 2000 for another four-year term, Greenspan is slated to serve as Fed chairman until 2004. He is not only a major figure in the world's economic past, but is central to its future.

Lisa Berg

Bob Woodward is an associate editor at The Washington Post where he has worked for 49 years and reported on every American president from Nixon to Trump. He has shared in two Pulitzer Prizes, first for the Post’s coverage of the Watergate scandal with Carl Bernstein, and second 20 years later as the lead Post reporter for coverage of the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

courtesy of the reader

James Naughton has won Tony Awards for his starring roles in City of Angels and Chicago on Broadway, and a Mac Award for his one-man show James Naughton: Street of Dreams. He directed the acclaimed Broadway revivals of Our Town and Arthur Miller's The Price. On television, he appeared in Brooklyn Bridge, The Cosby Mysteries, and Ally McBeal. His films include The Devil Wears Prada, The Good Mother, The Glass Menagerie, and The Paper Chase.

More books from this author: Bob Woodward

More books from this reader: James Naughton