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12 Stupid Things That Mess Up Recovery

Avoiding Relapse through Self-Awareness and Right Action

Published by Hazelden Publishing
Distributed by Simon & Schuster

In addition to staying connected to our support systems and avoiding opportunities to use during the coronavirus pandemic, we can also keep confronting and conquering the self-destructive things we think and do that undercut our health and sanity.

Concise advice on hunting down the personal culprits that sabotage sobriety and personal happiness.

To grow in recovery, we must grow up emotionally. This means getting honest with ourselves and facing up to the self-defeating thoughts and actions that put our sobriety at risk. Although there are as many ways to mess up recovery as there are alcoholics and addicts, some general themes exist, which include: confusing self-concern with selfishness; not making amends; using the program to try to become perfect; not getting help for relationship troubles; and believing that life should be easy.

In simple, down-to-earth language, Allen Berger explores the twelve most commonly confronted beliefs and attitudes that can sabotage recovery. He then provides tools for working through these problems in daily life. This useful guide offers fresh perspectives on how the process of change begins with basic self-awareness and a commitment to working a daily program.

Allen Berger, PhD, is a leading expert in the science of recovery from addiction. Sober since 1971, Dr. Berger was part of a pioneering recovery program for marines returning from Vietnam with alcohol and other drug addictions—first as a participant, then as a counselor. Since then, he has become a thought leader in the field, working in clinical settings and private practice. In demand as a speaker, workshop presenter, and interviewee, Dr. Berger is well-known in recovery circles, among those in recovery as well as therapists and clinicians around the world. He has lectured and written extensively on the process of recovery, emotional sobriety, and the therapeutic value of the Twelve Steps. 

More books from this author: Allen Berger