We'll Meet Again

We'll Meet Again

Read by: Jan Maxwell
At the heart of Mary Higgins Clark's stunning new novel of suspense is a brutal murder: that of Gary Lasch, a respected and successful young Greenwich, Connecticut doctor. He was found dead at home, his skull crushed by a blow with a Remington bronze sculpture, a prized piece from his art collection. The news strikes Greenwich society like a thunderbolt -- as does the news that Molly Carpenter Lasch, the beautiful young wife of the slain doctor, has been arrested for her husband's murder.
Nobody believes Molly's claim to have no memory of the events of the night of the crime -- and evidence against her is overwhelming. To escape a murder conviction, she accepts a plea-bargain, and subsequently her lawyer wins her early parole.
A few years later, on Molly's release from prison, she reasserts her innocence in front of TV cameras and reporters gathered at the prison gate. Among them is an old schoolmate, Fran Simmons, currently working as an investigative reporter for the True Crime television series. Determined to prove her innocence, Molly convinces Fran to research and present a program on Gary's death. Fran agrees and uncovers a chilling plot hidden in the heart of Greenwich's prestigious medical community.
We'll Meet Again is Mary Higgins Clark at her chilling best.
  • Simon & Schuster Audio | 
  • ISBN 9780743582896 | 
  • October 2008
Add to Cart
List Price $17.95
In Stock: Available for immediate download


Reading Group Guide

1) Mary Higgins Clark is wonderfully adept at using imagery to help readers create a detailed mental picture of a character. For example, Molly is described as looking like "a beautiful bird perched at the end of a branch, poised but ready at any second to take flight." (p. 15) Find and discuss another example of imagery used to fine-tune a character's external and internal identity.
2) Reread the scene in chapter eight where Fran is unpacking in her new apartment, and compare it to Molly's "homecoming" to Greenwich. How does each woman's different situation affect the way she handles the transition into her new life: the way she acts, thinks, feels, and even eats.
3) Molly's conviction in Gary's murder was originally due in large part to a rush to judge by the police, anxious to close their investigation. Do you think that police are often so anxious to solve a case that they zero in too quickly on one suspect? Do you think the police would have been able to spot the actual killer had they not assumed so quickly that Molly was guilty?
4) Discuss Fran's role as a reporter versus her role as Molly's friend. Does this "conflict of interest" compromise the integrity of Fran's reporting -- or does it spur her on to investigate even harder? Does a reporter who grows too close to her subject have an ethical responsibility to remove herself from the story?
5) One of the major clues in the myste see more

More Books from this Author

All Dressed in White
The Melody Lingers On
As Time Goes By
Death Wears a Beauty Mask and Other Stories

About the Author

Mary Higgins Clark
Photograph © Bernard Vidal

Mary Higgins Clark

Mary Higgins Clark, #1 international and New York Times bestselling author, has written thirty-four suspense novels; three collections of short stories; a historical novel; two children’s books; and a memoir, Kitchen Privileges. With her daughter Carol Higgins Clark, she has coauthored five more suspense novels. Her books have sold more than 100 million copies in the United States alone.