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What Men Want to Say to Women (But Can't)

“What Men Want to Say to Women (But Can't) serves as a wake-up call for women to finally understand men. It blows the lid off the lies Americans have been sold about men and masculinity and helps modern women feel the kind of compassion and respect for men that most Americans used to share. Denise McAllister is a bold writer, which is precisely what this subject needs.”—Suzanne Venker, Author of The Alpha Female’s Guide to Men & Marriage

No matter one’s political persuasion, most of us agree there’s something deeply wrong in America today. Conflict has reached a fever pitch as our nation has become alarmingly polarized in the political arena. Many look to politicians and public policies for solutions, but journalist Andrew Breitbart rightly said that politics couldn’t be fixed if culture is ignored, because “politics is downstream from culture.” McAllister would take this observation a step further—politics might be downstream from culture, but culture is downstream from relationships. If we don’t focus on the personal building blocks of society, we will fail to fix problems in culture and the politics that flow from it. If relationships are sick or broken—especially those between men and women—then everything else is affected. If there’s little love, respect, and trust there, you won’t find it anywhere else.

Men are tired of being dumped on. They have a lot to say to women about sex, equality in the workplace, raising boys, and the lie of “toxic masculinity,” but modern feminism and a politically correct culture have silenced them. This “war on men” has disrupted relationships and caused men to question their place in American society. “Misogyny,” “male privilege,” and “the Patriarchy” are buzzwords that shut men down. Some are so frustrated they’ve given up entirely—“Who needs women if all they’re going to do is use you and treat you like garbage?”

Anger, separation, and simply giving up aren't solutions to a festering problem. Instead, we need to heal relationships by learning to respect the designed purposes of masculinity and femininity. For this to happen, women will need to hear some hard truths about themselves and those they love. In What Men Want to Say to Women (But Can’t), cultural commentator and New York Times bestselling author Denise McAllister speaks to women on men’s behalf—exposing the lies of modern feminism and offering insights on how to rebuild broken relationships in the workplace, at home, and in the bedroom.

Here’s a sneak peek at a few things men would like to say to women, but can’t:

  • “When I look at your cleavage, it doesn’t mean I want to rape you.”
  • “Stop complaining about equal pay when you don’t do equal work.”
  • “Children need their father—stop shutting men out of the picture because you think you do everything better.”
  • “I will teach my son to compete—now go toss that participation trophy in the trash!”

“A triumph of compassion, insight, and good sense. Denise McAllister doesn’t just want to fix how men and women talk to each other. She wants to heal a fraying holy sacrament. Read this book to save your marriage—or to find one.” —Milo Yiannopoulos 

 

What Men Want to Say to Women (But Can't) serves as a wake up call for women to finally understand men. It blows the lid off the lies Americans have been sold about men and masculinity and helps modern women feel the kind of compassion and respect for men that most Americans used to share. Denise McAllister is a bold writer, which is precisely what this subject needs.”

– Suzanne Venker, Author of The Alpha Female’s Guide to Men & Marriage

“Part memoir, part cultural analysis, What Men Want to Say to Women (But Can’t) offers a searing indictment of the lies told by feminism about what men and women want—and don’t want. Drawing on her own experience of abuse, divorce, childrearing, and marriage, McAllister is a veritable second Shakespearean Kate, calling her sisters to cast off their shrewishness out of love for the fathers, husbands, brothers, and sons who love, serve, and protect them.”

– Rachel Fulton Brown, Author of Mary and the Art of Prayer: The Hours of the Virgin in Medieval Christian Life and Thought, and Milo Chronicles: Devotions, 2016-2019

“Too much of conservative media has become similar to the Left media in terms of culture. Too much assimilation. Too much pack mentality. Too little critical thinking. Too few contrarians. Denise is part of a remnant still willing to say difficult things and ask uncomfortable questions. At the very least, hear her out to check your own thinking. Whether you agree or disagree, you'll be smarter for it.”

– Steve Deace, Author of Truth Bombs: Confronting the Lies Conservatives Believe (To Our Own Demise) and host of Steve Deace Show, BlazeTV

“A triumph of compassion, insight, and good sense. Denise McAllister doesn’t just want to fix how men and women talk to each other. She wants to heal a fraying holy sacrament. Read this book to save your marriage—or to find one.” 

– Milo Yiannopoulos

“Denise McAllister has no fear of controversy. Her ideas about men and women bristle some, but also speak for many who feel cowed in today’s constricted public square. With fierce devotion to tradition, she tackles a world of gender that is changing at a breakneck pace and urges our society to pump the brakes.”

– David Marcus, New York Correspondent for The Federalist

“Sometimes a book comes along to articulate the inchoate insanity that leftist ideology has
wreaked on human affairs at a particular moment. Denise McAllister’s What Men Want to Say to
Women (But Can’t)
is that book, for this very uncomfortable period in relations between the
sexes. The two sexes, that is: women and men.  
    McAllister, who has had a varied career in competitive male-dominated fields, and who
clearly cherishes her relationships with the men in her family and her ambit, outlines the ways in
which various strains of recent ‘woke’ feminism and identity politics have distorted what women
expect and what men can and cannot deliver in relationships.  
    She is a Second Wave, ‘equality feminist,’ who believes that women should have all the
opportunities in the larger world, though outcomes may differ. Why? Because men and women
are different, physically, emotionally, cognitively, and often in what they want. Ideally, the sexes
are complementary. Yes, it’s ridiculous that this needs to be said. But it does. In fact, she is brave
to say it. 
     McAllister patiently unravels the myriad ways in which young women have been programed
to misunderstand the realities of relations between the sexes in dating, relationships, and family
life. They’ve been told, repeatedly, that men should conform to female sensibilities and desires,
even as women need not please or humor the men in their lives. How’s that working? The age of
those getting married for the first time keeps rising, because no one brought up this way has a
clue how to make marriage, with kids, work for either partner. The author is extremely clear-
headed about how and why this strain of society-destroying, cultural Marxism has been
promulgated. 
    If you have teenage or twenty-something children, daughters especially, this book will
clarify experience and help bring everyone back to the basic realities in how men think, so
women can deal realistically, if the goal is love and happy ever after.”

– Lisa Schiffren is a NYC-based writer on politics and culture and the mother of three young women, Senior Fellow at Independent Women's Forum