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The Inner War

A German WWII Survivor?s Journey from Pain to Peace

It is sometimes difficult to remember that in war there are innocents on all sides who suffer. German citizens who had no connection to the atrocities committed by their countrymen nonetheless endured great hardships because of them. In The Inner War, author Gerda Hartwich Robinson narrates her story as a German survivor of World War II. She tells how her life’s journey included hunger, fear, neglect, and physical and emotional abuse, and how she carried these injustices in her mind and body for many years, leading to debilitating back pain, headaches, panic attacks, depression, and feelings of inadequacy.

In this touching memoir, Robinson shows that the tragedies of war don’t end when the last bomb is dropped or the last prisoner freed; they continue in subtle but devastating ways. Like many German citizens during and after the war, Robinson was simply trying to survive a terrifying situation she had nothing to do with. She describes how her spirit was devastated by hopelessness, and how she entertained thoughts of suicide. The Inner War shares lessons she learned at a chronic pain rehabilitation center that allowed her to start on a path to peace and love.

"This is a true and heart-wrenching account of Gerda’s lifelong struggle to find relief from the effects of a devastating war. Her’s is the story of an innocent child of Nazi Germany who has searched a lifetime to find relief from chronic pain associated from the effects of this war in her childhood." —Jack Perkins, former host of Biography and author of Finding Mooswood, Finding God

"Written with frankness and integrity, Robinson's memoir . . . illuminates the trauma anyone might suffer after enduring physical and emotional upheavals, and pinpoints the damage done to children who experience war on a personal level." —Shelf Awareness

"This is a true and heart-wrenching account of Gerda’s lifelong struggle to find relief from the effects of a devastating war. Her’s is the story of an innocent child of Nazi Germany who has searched a lifetime to find relief from chronic pain associated from the effects of this war in her childhood." —Jack Perkins, former host of Biography and author of Finding Mooswood, Finding God

"Written with frankness and integrity, Robinson's memoir . . . illuminates the trauma anyone might suffer after enduring physical and emotional upheavals, and pinpoints the damage done to children who experience war on a personal level." —Shelf Awareness