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Red Sorrow

A Memoir of the Cultural Revolution

At the outbreak of the Cultural Revolution, 13-year-old Nanchu watched Red Guards destroy her home and torture her parents, whom they jailed. She was left to fend for herself and her younger brother. When she grew older, she herself became a Red Guard and was sent to the largest work camp in China. There she faced primitive conditions, sexual harassment, and the pressure to conform. Eventually, she was admitted to Madam Mao's university, where politics were more important than learning. Her testimony is essential reading for anyone interested in China or human rights.

"A searing memoir in fluid, conversational prose [that] adds to the pool of personal testimonies of China's historical nightmare."—Publishers Weekly

"Provides a fresh perspective to the harrowing chronicles of these children of the Revolution . . . It would be hard to read [her] account without being moved." —Kirkus Reviews

"Heart-rending . . . will be of interest to those who ponder the human experience of suffering." —Library Journal

"A searing memoir in fluid, conversational prose [that] adds to the pool of personal testimonies of China's historical nightmare."—Publishers Weekly

"Provides a fresh perspective to the harrowing chronicles of these children of the Revolution . . . It would be hard to read [her] account without being moved." —Kirkus Reviews

"Heart-rending . . . will be of interest to those who ponder the human experience of suffering." —Library Journal