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Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls: 100 Real-Life Tales of Black Girl Magic

Created by Rebel Girls / Edited by Lilly Workneh / Foreword by CaShawn Thompson / Text by Jestine Ware, Diana Odero, Sonja Thomas and Lilly Workneh

The latest installment in the New York Times bestselling Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls series, featuring 100 barrier-breaking Black women and girls who showcase the spirit of Black Girl Magic.

Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls: 100 Real-Life Tales of Black Girl Magic celebrates the lives and accomplishments of 100 barrier-breaking Black women and girls who showcase the spirit of Black Girl Magic. Edited by award-winning journalist Lilly Workneh, with a foreword by CaShawn Thompson, creator of the hashtag #BlackGirlsAreMagic, the book includes stories of real women from all walks of life written in fairy tale style. Arranged in alphabetical order by first name, each brief biography is accompanied by a vibrant full-page illustration.

Contemporaries like tennis player Naomi Osaka, astronaut Jeanette Epps, and filmmaker Ava DuVernay join historical figures like aviator Bessie Coleman, Empress Taytu Betul, and journalist Ida B. Wells. Readers will also meet chess champion Phiona Mutesi, video game designer Muriel Tramis, punk rocker Poly Styrene, and chef Leah Chase.

The book exclusively features the work of Black female and non-binary editors, authors, and illustrators as they drive the stories of these phenomenal women from around the world and throughout history.

About Black Girl Magic
CaShawn Thompson, a proud third-generation native of Washington, DC, came up with the concept “Black Girls Are Magic” when she was a little girl growing up with her mother, grandmother, and aunts. It sprang forth fully formed from the mind of a poor little Black girl who didn’t yet have the words to describe the brilliance she saw in the women in her family, but had heard countless tales of fairies, witches, and magicians. It was just magic to her. And it still is. 

Black Girls Are Magic became wildly popular in 2013 after CaShawn began using the phrase online (it was later shortened to the hashtag #BlackGirlMagic) to uplift and praise the accomplishments, beauty, and other amazing qualities of Black women.

More books in this series: Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls